Online internet courses by Call of the Page

Are you interested in a Call of the Page course? We run courses on haiku (beginner and intermediate, and advanced). We also run workshops and courses on tanka; tanka stories/prose; haibun; shahai; and other genres.

Please email Karen or Alan at our joint email address: admin@callofthepage.org
We will let you know more about these courses.

Call of the Page (Alan & Karen)

Thursday, June 27, 2013

A selection of haiku about rain by Alan Summers (rain haiku)



a selection of haiku about rain
by Alan Summers



long hard rain my compass your true north

Publications credits: Frogpond 36.1 • 2013



this small ache and all the rain too robinsong

Publications credits: Modern Haiku vol. 44.1 winter/spring 2013



cabbage butterflies-
a man with an umbrella
when there's no rain


Publication Credits:  Under the Basho Vol 1.1 Autumn 2013



early morning rain
the sound between
the sound

Publication Credits: Asahi Shimbun (Japan 2013)



Cloud kigo
a light rain patters across
your nightingale floors

Publication Credits: Asahi Shimbun (Japan 2013)

“In search of the ultimate season word to associate with clouds, Alan Summers observes how “rain writes its own story across floorboards that sing like a bird.”

David McMurray is professor of intercultural studies at The International University of Kagoshima where he lectures on international haiku. At the Graduate School he supervises students who research haiku. He is a correspondent school teacher of Haiku in English for the Asahi Culture Center in Tokyo.



the scent of rain-
I stretch the truth
into clouds

Publication Credits: Blithe Spirit 23.2. 2013



the drum of the rain ghosting bare hands

Publication Credits:  Under the Basho Vol 1.1 Autumn 2013




blue sky rain
the sunshine leaks
from pavements


from White Dust Ghosts – a series of haiku poems

Publication Credits: 
(Tribe issue 22,  2013))
 



lullaby of rain
another pinch of saffron
in the pumpkin soup

Publications credits: Heron’s Nest (Volume XIV, Number 4 2012 December 2012); The Haiku Calendar 2014 (Snapshot Press, 2013); "The Vast Sky, An International Anthology of Contemporary Haiku" after a quote from Sekito Kisen, "The vast sky is not hindered by the floating clouds." (2013)

Award Credit: Editors' Choices, Heron’s Nest (Volume XIV, Number 4: Dec. 2012): Runner-up, The Haiku Calendar Competition 2013



velum clouds–
through the small hours
this writing in rain

Publications credits: Haiku Novine ISSN 1451-3889 (2012)



toy suns
the winter-dark rain
smashes the city

Publications credits:
Blithe Spirit (vol 23 no. 4 November 2012); Does Fish-God Know (YTBN Press 2012) ISBN-13: 9781479211043 / ISBN-10: 1479211044



rain on the river–
when does white become
its darkest colour

Publications credits: Haiku News (Vol. 1 No. 38 2012)



drifting rain 
my hundred autumn rooms 
to be alone

Publication Credits: Mainichi Shimbun (2012) ; Best of Mainichi 2012 (2013)



does fish-god know?
rain can fall
from clear blue skies

Publications credits: Blithe Spirit (vol 22 no. 3 2012); Sea Bandits ed. Aubrie Cox (2012); Does Fish-God Know  (Yet To Be Named Free Press 2012)

Award credit: Winner of the Blithe Spirit Cover competition for issue 22/2  (John Parsons cover artwork Autumn 2012)


the names of rain
a blackbird’s subsong
into dusk

Publications credits: Haiku News Vol. 1 No. 35 (2012)


hard-blue sky
the ghost touch of rain
on sloe-eyed horses

Publications credits: Blithe Spirit (Vol 22 No. 3 2012)



rain on the river the jesus star shifting

Publications credits: Janice M Bostok Haiku Prize 2012 Anthology Evening Breeze



bouncing rain
I force the hotel window
a little wider

Publications credits:
Blithe Spirit March 2012; Does Fish-God Know (YTBN Press 2012)



rain clouds
conversations shift around
the train carriage

Publications credits: Mainichi Shimbun (Japan 2011)  
Award Credits: Honourable Mention Best of Mainichi 2011



this delicate rain
the petal makes a typo
of a gravestone date

Publications credits: tinywords, haiku & other small poems ( 2011)



light rain
sharing the evening
with blackbird song

Publications credits: Mainichi Shimbun (Japan 2010)



rain ceases
as I leave the sycamore...
one more kingfisher

Publications credits: Blithe Spirit vol. 14 no. 4 (2004)



late september rain
cutting through the lane
and the mist

Publications credits: in a heron’s eye  (Paper Wasp 2000)



the rain
almost a friend
this funeral

Publications credits: Azami #28 (Japan 1995); Snapshots 4 (1998); First Australian online Anthology (October 1999): Blithe Spirit article On minimalism and other things  DJ Peel Vol 9 No.3 (1999); tempslibre (2001); Cornell University, Mann Library, U.S.A. Poet of the Month (October 2001); The Omnibus Anthology, haiku and senryu  (Hub Editions Hub Haiku series 2001); Hidden (British Haiku Society Anthology 2002); The New Haiku (Snapshot Press, 2002); First Australian Haiku Anthology (2003); Birmingham Words Magazine Issue 3 (Autumn 2004); seven magazine feature: “Three lines of simple beauty”  (2006); tempslibre (2010); Blogging Along Tobacco Road: Alan Summers - Three Questions (2010); Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 , Part 2  (Akita International Haiku Network 2010);  The Temple Bell Stops: Contemporary Poems of Grief, Loss and Change (Modern English Tanka Press 2012); THFhaiku app for iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch (2011); The In-Between Season (With Words Pamphlet Series 2012)

Award credit:
Highly Commended, Haiku Collection Competition, (Snapshot Press 1998)
Joint 9th Best of Issue, Snapshot Five (1999)



the geraniums
flowering again
just before the rain

Note: Queensland poem

Publications credits: Potpourri Publications (USA 1994); sundog, an australian year, (sunfast press 1997 reprinted 1998)

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Sunday, June 23, 2013

Online Haiku Course Early Bird Rate offer extended until July 7th - haiku poetry : poetry courses in haiku


News update 2017:
With Words has now become Call of the Page:

You can either go to our contact page:
https://www.callofthepage.org/contact/

Or email Karen at:

You can learn more about Karen and Alan at:

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2013 workshops

We are extending the Early Bird rate for the August 1st Online Haiku Course until the 7th of July.

Haiku: 
The shortest of all short poems, with an intentional rearrangement of words from language, that elicits an emotional reaction in each reader far greater than the sum of its physical count of words.  
Alan Summers, Writing Poetry: the haiku way (Extract from the Book in Progress)



The "early bird" rate is US$70 and full price would be US$85.

Equivalent in British currency is £45 early bird rate, and £55 full price. 

To find out more about what the courses involve and how they run, please email karen@withwords.org.uk for an information sheet.

Many thanks!


Karen at With Words
 




Quotes from our students for Alan's teaching:
For a biography on Alan scroll down to the end at this weblink:
  

Hi Alan - thanks so much for this....I learned a lot... I really had no idea there was so much to this art, and I'm completely fascinated. Your comments are extremely perceptive.

MK

As you probably know by now, I use every corner of my life as a way of reflection of my psychological personal development - haiku in itself is great for this, but working with you has just elevated the experience a 100 fold.

Your support over the last couple of years or so have just been such an amazing gift to me - bless you.

I am well aware of the fact that I wouldn't be having such an amazing journey with my haiku if wasn't for you.

FT

This was the first online class I have ever taken and I have thoroughly enjoyed it! Thanks for providing the opportunity and for making it affordable. I learned so much and integrated a lot of what I learned.

Alan is a fantastic teacher, as you already know. I would love to take another course with Alan.  

Please take good care and have an enjoyable 2013. Anne

What wonderful feedback to hear that my heart has touched someone else's. To me, that is the best reason to write. Your comments have been invaluable.  Debbie 

Thank you so much for all of the information you have provided about gendai haiku.  It has definitely sparked my interest in learning more. I also just want to say thank you for providing this course.  It is obvious that you spent a lot of time preparing the course material.  I also really appreciate your thoughtful responses to our posts.  LM


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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

TED Talk : Transcript from the TEDx video: Amazement of the Ordinary: Life through a haiku lens by Alan Summers



TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. It started out (in 1984) as a conference bringing together people from three worlds: Technology, Entertainment, Design: http://www.ted.com/pages/about

Amazement of the Ordinary talk on haiku: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxLTiR7AKDE



Transcript from the TEDx video:
Amazement of the Ordinary:  
Life through a haiku lens

“We see things not as they are, but as we are.”
That’s a quote from the Talmud, an ancient text, containing opinions of thousands of rabbis on a variety of subjects.

Now I’m sure many of us have been there, overlooking the ordinary because we feel it’s… well ordinary… mundane, boring, annoying, a distraction, or mostly unnoticed in our busy schedules.

I’d like to talk about how a tiny practice of reading or writing haiku, the world’s shortest type of poetry, can add an extra depth to our world.

I’m adding examples of my own haiku poems to attempt to inject some lateral shift time, as in our linear lives some of us can rarely take time to step off, safely, we’ve just got to keep going even if it kills us, even if it alienates those we love.

Lateral shift?   Bending time?  No.  

It’s just that sometimes we are only aware of how long time is if
1) it’s horribly boring, or
2) we are in great danger. 

This could be your third choice, your third option, and all without a safety net, to have something parallel on your timeline.

mist haze-
a crow cleans its beak
on a rooftop aerial

Ah, perhaps you are a driver, worried you might miss the early morning sights and sounds of birds getting up for their own day ahead?

traffic jam
a driver fingers the breeze
through the sunroof

One of the world’s greatest short story writers, Raymond Carver, back in the old century, wrote about people who worried whether their cars would start in the morning; about unemployment and debt; of individuals who make our day to day life tick.  He never pretended a wonderland still existed but said:  “a writer sometimes needs to be able to just stand and gape at this or that thing—a sunset or an old shoe—in absolute and simple amazement.”



Are we not writers of our own life, writing out cheques, or pin numbering our way to coffee and snacks;  those last minute remembered bunch of flowers at a supermarket, to filling our cars with petrol to get somewhere…

an attic window sill
a wasp curls
into its own dust

…and however much we can afford a mortage, or need to pay the landlord…


the rain
almost a friend
this funeral

As the 1931 song says: "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?"

Brother, Sister, can you spare yourself a haiku moment?

sunlight breaks
on a bird
and its portion of the roof


A day consists of 86 thousand and 400 seconds: A haiku is six seconds. 



Try bending some time, maybe on your travels, catching a…

train whistle
a blackbird hops
along its notes



Mary Oliver, a poet, said, from When Death Comes:

When it’s over, I want to say: all my life
I was a bride married to amazement.

I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world.



I’d like to end with this last haiku, that takes less than six seconds to say,

and, time me if you’d like…



this small ache and all the rain too robinsong



Other links:
http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Amazement-of-the-ordinary-life
 


Online courses in haiku and related genres:

Japan Times award-winning writer Alan Summers regularly teaches haiku and tanka, and other popular online courses.  

For more details please contact Karen at:  admin@callofthepage.org



haiku poetry publication credits:

mist haze-
a crow cleans its beak
on a rooftop aerial


Publications credits: Azami 38 (1996); First Australian Online Anthology (1999); Cornell University, Mann Library, U.S.A. "Daily Haiku" poet (October 2001); The Haiku Calendar 2003 (Snapshot Press); Watermark: A Poet’s Notebook - Crows (2004); Wing Beats: British Birds in Haiku (Snapshot Press, 2008)

Award credits:
Runner-up, The Haiku Calendar Competition 2002 (Snapshot Press)


traffic jam
a driver fingers the breeze
through the sunroof

Publications credits: Snapshots 2 (1998); tinywords.com (2002); The New Haiku (Snapshot Press, 2002); Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 , Part 2  (Akita International Haiku Network 2010)



an attic window sill
a wasp curls
into its own dust

Publications credits: Woodpecker Special Issue, Extra Shuttle Issue ISSN 1384-6094 (1997); Snapshots Four  (1998); First Australian Online Haiku Anthology (1999); Haiku International 2000 Anthology, Japan ISBN 4-8161-0675-8 (2000); HaikuOz Information Kit (2001); The Omnibus Anthology, Haiku and Senryu, Hub Editions ISBN 1-903746-09-4 (2001); Cornell University, Mann Library, U.S. "Daily Haiku" poet (October 2001); tinywords.com (2002); Yomiuri Shimbun, Japan (for my birthday, September 16th 2002 while in Tokyo); The New Haiku, Snapshot Press, ISBN 978-1-903543-03-0  (2002); Raku Teapot: Haiku Book and CD pub. Raku Teapot Press in association with White Owl Publishing Book: ISBN 1-891691-03-1 CD:  ISBN 1-891691-04-X (2003); First Australian Haiku Anthology, Paper Wasp ISBN 0 9577925 9 X (2003); Yomiuri Shimbun Go-Shichi-Go On-Line feature Language Lab (2005); Swot, Arts & Literature magazine, Bath Spa University (2007); Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 , Part 2  (Akita International Haiku Network 2010); THFhaiku 2012 app


Award credit:
Highly Commended, Haiku Collection Competition, Snapshot Press (1998)
Joint 7th Best of Issue, Snapshot Five (1999)

Education: HaikuOz Information Kit:  The Australian Haiku Society Getting Started With Haiku.



the rain
almost a friend
this funeral

Publications credits: Azami #28 (Japan, 1995); Snapshots 4 (1998); First Australian online Anthology (October 1999): Blithe Spirit article On minimalism and other things  DJ Peel Vol 9 No.3 (1999); tempslibre (Belgium 2001); Cornell University, Mann Library, U.S.A. "Daily Haiku" (Oct 2001); The Omnibus Anthology, haiku and senryu  (Hub Editions Hub Haiku series 2001); Hidden (British Haiku Society Anthology 2002); The New Haiku ISBN 978-1-903543-03-0 (Snapshot Press, 2002); First Australian Haiku Anthology (2003); Birmingham Words Magazine Issue 3 (Autumn 2004); seven magazine feature: “Three lines of simple beauty”  (2006); tempslibre (Belgium 2010); Blogging Along Tobacco Road: Alan Summers - Three Questions (2010); Travelogue on World Haiku Festival 2002 , Part 2  (Akita International Haiku Network 2010);  The Temple Bell Stops: Contemporary Poems of Grief, Loss and Change (Modern English Tanka Press 2012); THFhaiku app for iPhone/iPad/iPod Touch (2011); The In-Between Season (With Words Pamphlet Series 2012)

Award credit:
Highly Commended, Haiku Collection Competition, (Snapshot Press 1998)
Joint 9th Best of Issue, Snapshot Five (1999)

Temps Libre analysis in French:




sunlight breaks
on a bird
and its portion of the roof

hi   wa   torini   yane   no   ibasho   ni   sosogi   keri

Romanised version (Romaji) trans.
Hiromi Inoue, Masegawa Kawauchi town, Ehime Prefecture, Japan

Publications credits:
Haigaonline vol. III (2003); Haiku Friends ed. Masaharu Hirata (Umeda, Osaka 2003)



train whistle
a blackbird hops
along its notes

Publications credits:
Presence #47 (2012): THF Per Diem (September 2012): The Elements


In Swedish:

tågvissla
en koltrast skuttar
längs med dess toner

trans. Marcus Liljedahl
Gothenburg, Sweden


theevandiude choolam
oru karutha pakshi thulli
athin swarangalil

Malayalam translation by Narayanan Raghunathan (2012)



neruppu vantiyin choolam
oru karuppu paravai thulliyatu
antha svarangalil

Tamizh translation by Narayanan Raghunathan (2012)


train seeti
ek kale rang ki chidiya naachti
vah svar lahiri me

Hindi translation by Narayanan Raghunathan (2012)



this small ache and all the rain too robinsong

Publications credits: Modern Haiku vol. 44.1 winter/spring 2013

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Thursday, June 13, 2013

Alan Summers headlining the Words & Ears Poetry Event (The Swan Hotel, Bradford on Avon) July 25th 2013






































Plus Open Mic opportunities!

The Swan Hotel:
photograph: https://plus.google.com/photos/at/106904345684679385847?hl=en


















The Swan Hotel Events:  
http://www.theswanbradford.co.uk/index.html

The Swan Hotel Location: 
http://www.theswanbradford.co.uk/location.html

Less than five minutes from Bradford on Avon train station, go over the bridge towards the town centre (left hand side of the bridge, and enter via rear entrance through car park, coach house annex on your right where you see the silver people carrier vehicle).
http://www.booking.com/hotel/gb/the-swan-bradford-on-avon.html?aid=329009


w. W
Words & Ears organisers:
Helen Murray: http://www.helenmurrayphotos.com/
Dawn Gorman: http://www.dawngorman.co.uk/AboutPage.html


Cloud kigo: Alan Summers haiku in Asahi Shimbun (Japan newspaper)

Cloud Kigo©Alan Summers, Bradford on Avon 13th June 2013


















Cloud kigo
a light rain patters across
your nightingale floors


Alan Summers
Publication Credits: Asahi Shimbun (Japan, 2013)




"In search of the ultimate season word to associate with clouds, Alan Summers observes how “rain writes its own story across floorboards that sing like a bird.” I like the idea of the cloud kigo. Readers will too. It is always my pleasure to work with you on haiku.”

David McMurray writes a haiku column for the Asahi Newspaper (Asahi Shimbun, Japan). He is also Professor of Intercultural Studies at The International University of Kagoshima (Japan) where he lectures on international haiku.


“season is the soul of haiku”
William J. Higginson (The Haiku Seasons, p20)



The Haiku Seasons
Poetry of the Natural World
by: William J. Higginson

http://www.stonebridge.com/shopexd.asp?id=88

"The Haiku Seasons presents the historical and modern Japanese usage of seasonal themes in poetry. It shows, as nothing else in the literature has done, the growing dialogue between poets in Japan and other countries...An extremely valuable work!"
—Elizabeth Searle Lamb, retired editor, Frogpond


A Little About the Kigo Technique in Haiku
by Alan Summers

Japanese kigo are a strong allusion device (there are others) and can contain cultural and emotional tones of extreme intensity within Japan. The possibilities of kigo as a tool or device of choice, can be equally considered as valid, as any other technique of haiku.

Kisetsu

Kisetsu (season, seasonal aspect)
The seasons. The seasonal aspect of the vocabulary (kigo) and subject matter (kidai) of traditional tanka, renga, and haiku; a deep feeling for the passage of time, as known through the objects and events of the seasonal cycle. [1]

Season words, and the Japanese kigo system, are not only derived from observations of nature, they can allude to a country’s historical, cultural, and literary past.

Haiku are 'seasonal' rather than 'nature' centered poems. If looked at in this way it allows for urban seasonal markers and seasonal celebrations; in other words from this perspective it would be legitimate to compose haiku centered on the human world because the human world is also seasonal.

I feel that non-Japanese haiku can achieve an aspect of kisetsu [1] with seasonal words and phrases.

[1] William J. Higginson with Penny Harter, The Haiku Handbook: How to Write, Share, and Teach Haiku, published by Kodansha International. Copyright (C) 1989 by William J. Higginson. (p289 & 291)

Amazon USA
http://www.amazon.com/Haiku-Handbook--25th-Anniversary-Edition/dp/4770031130/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371118239&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Haiku+Handbook

Amazon UK
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Haiku-Handbook-Write-Teach-Appreciate/dp/4770031130/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1371118298&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Haiku+Handbook

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Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Haiku Workshops and Events: Alan Summers in London | Kensington Library

UPDATE!
There'll be a new program regarding the next haiku and rap workshop events, very exciting developments. 
 
A Pro Art Event

Haiku and Rap
Kensington Library 
http://www.rbkc.gov.uk/az/az.asp?orgid=858
Friday 7th June 4.30 p.m. - 5.30 p.m.

For workshops with sixth formers, and also older people.

  • Introducing Haiku and its history
  • How do you write Haiku?

I'll be showing both Classic and Contemporary examples of haiku, as well as reading from Does Fish-God Know.

There'll be a relaxed fun exercise that can be continued from home:

  • Haiku: Another Way of Seeing



Does Fish-God Know:
http://area17.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/does-fish-god-know-haiku-collection-by.html



For anyone intrigued by haiku and unable to attend we do run online haiku workshops:  http://area17.blogspot.co.uk/2013/03/dates-for-next-online-haiku-tanka.html

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